Biologist predicts: CRISPR won’t slow crop biotech innovation

Biologist predicts CRISPR won’t slow crop biotech innovation

Once widely adopted, genetically modified plants will help feed the world and change the crop input industry significantly. AgriBusiness Global interviewed Oliver Peoples, Ph.D., Chair and CEO of Yield10 Bioscience to find out more about the latest information on GMOs and genome editing. Dr. Peoples knows the status of GMOs and what this technology can be expected in the coming years in the industry.

Where do you see and what causes these shifts in the regulatory environment over the next several years?

Genetically modified crops will help feed the world and significantly improve the crop input industry if they are widely accepted. AgriBusiness Global consulted Oliver Peoples, Professor, CEO, and Chairman of Yield10 Bioscience, to find out the latest information on genome editing and GMOs. Dr. Peoples offers a more comprehensive understanding of the status and market of GMOs in the years to come.

There seem to be a growing interest in performance and nutritional characteristics allowed by CRISPR genome editing in America, Australia, and in parts of Asia and Africa. For example in Kenya, the health of bananas, which are an essential food crop, is of concern as climate change affects development negatively.

In many parts of the globe, regulatory agencies are re-evaluating the structure for the regulation of biotechnology plants, especially throughout the view of pressure created by erratic weather patterns and food security concerns based on recent advances in biotechnology combined with the safety record of crops developed using biotechnology. The performance and nutritional characteristics allowed by the CRISPR genome editor seem to be increasingly in demand in the Americas, Australia and parts of Asia and Africa. In Kenya, for example, the security of bananas, which are an essential food crop, is concerned, as climate change affects production negatively.